Hawaii: Waikiki and Oahu
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Back to Index Page for Mel and Wes Stories
Click Here to Open: Slang Dictionary

Lesson: Waikiki and Sites on Oahu

Setting the scene:

      The family departs Xi'an in China and arrives in Hawaii for a two-week visit. Dad must immediately begin teaching advanced computer courses in Honolulu, however, the other family members are able to see the sights. Hawaii is a popular tourist destination, especially the island of Oahu.
      The sky is a brilliant blue with numerous puffy clouds floating above upthrust mountain peaks. Sound from a nearby ocean surf washes over the family. A few seagulls squawk for food.

People in This Story:
  • Dad; Mel; Mom; Leilani (tour guide); Wes
  • Brand Name or Company Name item is in green.
  • Slang terms are linked to the Slang Dictionary. Click on the term to view its meaning.
  • "Speed Talk" is in pink; meaning is in [brackets].

    Story:

    Dad:       Sorry that I can't head out with you today. My first class starts in an hour, but I'll see you later this afternoon. Meanwhile, the company arranged for a tour guide to show some of the local sites. Her name is Leilani.

    Mel:       Oh, that's rich! [Laughing] As in the song, "Sweet Leilani"? That just cracks me up!

    Dad:       Yes. I suppose it is a bit ironic. Go ahead and make do with the situation. I'll catch you on the flip side.

    [Dad leaves as the tour guide arrives. He departs in a company car.]

    Leilani:   Aloha. [Hawaiian word for "Welcome" and "Goodbye"] Is this your first time to Hawaii?

    Mom:       It is for the kids. I've been here a few times before.

    Wes:       Hi, Leilani. Do you know any real cool spots?

    Leilani:   Of course. What do you think? That I'm a stick in the mud?

    Wes:       Uh... No, I mean... Uh...

    Mel:       Wes, you've got egg on the face. You better quit while you're behind.

    Leilani:   Hah! Never mind, Wes. I'm just teasing. I don't think you're a jerk.

    Wes:       Thanks, Leilani. That takes a load off my mind.

    Mom:       Wes, if you're through horsing around, we can start the tour.

    [Leilani drives from the hotel along Waikiki Beach to get a good view of Diamond Head. They circle back to Punch Bowl. She then drives up Likelike highway and stops at the Pali Lookout. It boasts a spectacular view and was the location of a historic battle between King Kamehameha and his foes on Oahu. Kamehameha's men pushed many of their foes off the cliff to death.]

    Mel:       Mom, isn't this the place where Dad proposed marriage to you?

    Mom:       Yes. We were looking out there, towards the North Shore. It's still a beautiful place and brings back pleasant memories.

    Leilani:   Hawaii is famous for romance. One of my favorite movies is Blue Hawaii with Elvis Presley. [Sighing] I still have a way's to go. No boyfriend yet.

    Wes:       You don't need to worry about that, Leilani. Actually, you're quite easy on the eyes.

    Mel:       What's with you today, Wes? Has the Hawaiian sun already fried your brain? Or have you secretly been watching TV soaps?

    Wes:       No. I'm just being nice. So, lay off.

    Mom:       Enough of that nonsense. Leilani, can you drive us along the North Shore?

    Leilani:   Certainly. We can visit the Polynesian Cultural Center in Laie.

    Wes:       That's swell. Dad used to drive a tour bus there years ago.

    Mel:       He also taught at Brigham Young University in Laie.

    Leilani:   I know those places. Both are near the Mormon temple. We can see all of them today and finish the night with a Luau [Hawaiian feast].

    Mom:       Thank you, Leilani. You are a very good guide.

    [The family extends this Hawaii trip to include the Big Island and Maui. Click here to see the following story: Outer Islands of Hawaii.]

  • © Page Publisher: Duane R. Hurst